Milkweed by Jerry Spinelli
Told from the perspective of a young orphaned boy in the Nazi-occupied Warsaw ghetto, Milkweed explores the value of identity and the frightening realities of the Holocaust through an innocent eye. The story’s narrator, the orphan boy recalling his past experience from his future life in America, takes you through his life as, as a child, he goes through life not knowing who or what he is- a Jew, a gypsy, a “StopTheif”? Jerry Spinelli weaves an emotionally charged story in a refreshingly new voice, and seems to achieve the complexity needed for such an in-depth tale.

“It was good, I guess. It was pretty action packed and adventurous.” Freshman Alex Wall

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Ender Wiggin, born from a family of prodigies, is chosen to fight alien type figures to save the world from being destroyed. Before being selected, Ender wears a monitor of sorts that lets the international military services to see events just as he does. Entering Battle School to save the world from “buggers”, Ender makes his way to become the top student and travels to the alien planet to battle. Arriving at the planet, Ender experiences a change of heart and makes it his mission to find a new place for where the buggers can live.

“It was actually a really good book. Had lots of action. I just didn’t like how, in the book, they had those little monitor things in the back of their heads, but I’d give it a 12 out of 10.” Sophomore James Lancaster

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
During the Great Depression, the Joads family is driven from their poor, sharecropping lifestyle and
Oklahoma home due to drought, economical hardships, and changes in the agricultural industries to California after being trapped in the Dust Bowl to seek jobs and a chance at the future.

“At first it was boring and hard to get into, but then it got better- very depressing, sad, suspenseful, and I wanted it to get a happy ending but there never was one. It left me with sad thoughts. Overall, though, it was a logical read!” Junior Victoria Genua

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Robert Watson, an English explorer heading to the North Pole, comes into contact with a mysterious figure in ill-condition taken aboard his ship, Victor Frankenstein. Several days pass and when Frankenstein’s health is restored to moderate condition, he recounts his life and his journey as a Swiss student who finds the secret to animating lifeless matter and his torturous regret and failed escapes from the “daemon” he created.

“I liked it because the plot was interesting- it was a different story, not what teachers usually give us. I would recommend it because it is a lot more different than out regular school readings.”
Senior Lacey Meisner

Frances Miyares / Graphics Department

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6 thoughts on “Summer Reading Rating

  1. This article really encouraged me to read some of these books. Normally I would not think about going to the library to check out one of these books but hearing what other people my age said about them and the summaries of the books really sparked my interest.

  2. I’ve (clearly) heard of most of these books and a lot of my friends have encourged me to read them, but I never got around to actually picking one up. I think this article really sets a bar for softly pushing students to actually read the summer reading. Overall I thought it was a great peice.

  3. “It was actually a really good book. Had lots of action. I just didn’t like how, in the book, they had those little monitor things in the back of their heads, but I’d give it a 12 out of 10.” Sophomore James Lancaster

    12 out of 10? Should I be encouraged to read the book or sad that sophomore’s can’t count.

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